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Volume 13, No. 1 - July 2013

Issue #25

TABLE OF CONTENTS


EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: CHANGE AND CONTINUITY, pp. 1-2

CHRIS MATTHEW SCIABARRA

With this issue, The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies begins a collaboration with the Pennsylvania State University Press, which will manage all aspects of design, production, distribution, and subscription fulfillment. In embarking on this new arrangement, the journal unveils a new look, but retains its commitment to introducing new writers to the ever-expanding world of Rand studies.

RAND, PATERSON, AND THE PROBLEM OF ANARCHISM, pp. 3-25

STEPHEN COX

This essay is concerned with individualist arguments for and against anarchism. It analyzes the views of Ayn Rand, Isabel Paterson, and libertarian anarchists, with special emphasis on the concepts of consent, noninitiation of force, and non-self-sacrifice. The essay concludes with a critical assessment of individualist anarchist and limited-government theories, suggesting that while some are more useful than others, none can be considered complete, conclusive, or fully consistent.

LITTLE PRIME MOVERS:
THE FOUNTAINHEAD AND ATLAS SHRUGGED AS YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE
, pp. 26-45

WILL STOCKTON

This essay accounts for the adolescent popularity of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged by arguing that both novels indirectly appropriate the mid-twentieth-century figure of the rebel. By denying their "prime movers" much of a childhood, however, both novels heroize rebels who never suffer the dilemma that defines the adolescent according to Erik H. Erikson:  the struggle between identity and role confusion.  Following Erikson and Julia Kristeva, this essay reads Rand's prime movers as figures of a post-Oedipal fantasy of self-reconciliation and career-oriented drive—figures who invite their reader into the fantasy of a life lived without adolescence's defining identity crisis.

REVIEWS

AN END TO OVER AND AGAINST, pp. 46-68


ROBERT L. CAMPBELL

Two complementary biographies of Ayn Rand were published in 2009: Goddess of the Market, by Jennifer Burns, and Ayn Rand and the World She Made, by Anne Heller. Burns focuses on Rand's influence on American political thought, while Heller's concern is Rand the screenwriter, novelist, and author of her personal mythos. Both books are meticulously researched and well written; neither author espouses Rand's philosophy or agrees with her politics. Such books establish that Rand's ideas have become part of American culture and are no longer set over and against it.

DISCUSSION

REPLY TO ROGER E. BISSELL:
PERPLEXING LOGIC, pp. 69-72


DENNIS C. HARDIN


In his article, "The Logic of Liberty" (Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 12, no. 1), Roger Bissell uses an analytical diagram to show that Ayn Rand was wrong to characterize the differences between liberals and conservatives in terms of the mind-body dichotomy. Bissell claims that the key philosophical difference is not the mind-body dichotomy, but the malevolent universe premise. However, the diagram Bissell uses to discredit Rand's position exhibits a serious design flaw: it presumes the mind-body split by implying the metaphysical superiority of one over the other. This fundamental flaw in his analysis renders his criticism of Rand invalid.


REJOINDER TO DENNIS C. HARDIN:
A GUIDE FOR THE PERPLEXED, pp. 73-78


ROGER E. BISSELL

The author reiterates his thesis that the motivation for power lust in liberals, conservatives, and totalitarians cannot be explained by "metaphysical importance" (or even, as per Hardin's suggestion, "superior metaphysical importance") of economic or noneconomic activity per se, but only by the metaphysical fear that voluntary action in one or both of these realms evokes in statists of whatever stripe.  Rand actually made both of these arguments, but only the latter has psychological explanatory power and plausibility in terms of Rand's discussion of the benevolent and malevolent universe premises, and thus is to be preferred over the former.

VOL. 13, NO. 1:   CONTRIBUTOR BIOGRAPHIES


INDEX BY ISSUE NUMBER

TABLES OF CONTENTS

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CONTRIBUTOR BIOGRAPHIES

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26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

 


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